Friday Flowers

The garden is moving so quickly at the moment that I simply cannot keep up with the photos!

I don’t know what to post

What to feature

It’s such a tough choice when I’m racking up the playing with light series, but then something else pops up and I need to photograph that too.

Not that I’m lamenting the fact it’s such a hardship to have too many photos 🙂

So I’ve come to the decision to include photos from the past two weeks, sit back and enjoy the garden porn.

First we’ll begin with the ‘poached egg’ Narcissi I seem to have acquired this spring without remembering or realising I’d bought them in autumn. I’m calling them poached egg, because this is how Ronnie describes them and I have to agree. Then, just as I’d commented on her blog about buying some myself, I noticed them opening in my garden too!
They are in fact ‘Bridal Crown’ Narcissi, they’re only small and have a strong perfume for such a tiny size. I planted them in various places around the garden but they look at their best in a pot I made up with all leftover bulbs… this one originally had Crocus Tommasinianus and Cream Beauty, and now have Bridal Crown and Minnow Narcissus and Muscari. The pot needless to say, is rammed full with bulbs; but oh so worth it.

Narcissus Minnow and Muscari

Narcissi ‘Bridal Crown’ and ‘Minnow’

Narcissus ‘Silver Chimes’ and Muscari

Pot filled with bulbs

Hawthorn

Don’t let the following photos fool you; trust me there aren’t many blooms on the cherry this year, although it’s better than nothing! I’ve decided that in my next garden, assuming it’s large enough; the first thing I’ll buy will be one of the Plum blossoms. Perhaps even, I’ll end up with a garden that already has one!
So, for now I’ll make do with these blossoms on the Autumn Cherry, perhaps I’ll also plant one of these? The possibilities are endless 😉

Autumn Flowering Cherry

Autumn Flowering Cherry

Autumn Flowering Cherry

Fuji Cherry Kojo No Mai is almost finished blooming, however I’ve noticed the second one hasn’t yet started blooming and have half wondered whether something is wrong as it doesn’t normally bloom so long after the first.

Fuji Cherry Kojo No Mai

Fuji Cherry Kojo No Mai

I’d neglected the Snake’s Head Fritillaries so far on the blog. They’re almost over now, perhaps this is a sign I’m falling out of love with them??? Perhaps if I had amazing drifts of them like Pauline then I’d still be in love?

Snake’s Head Fritillary

And finally I’ll leave you with these:

You know what’s coming over the next few weeks…

Forget-Me-Not

Copyright 2013 Liz.
All rights reserved. Content created by Liz for Gwirrel’s Garden.

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17 thoughts on “Friday Flowers

  1. Loving the plant porn Liz, but how are you not still entranced by your fritillaries? Though I do agree that it is impossible to compete with Pauline’s drifts. Nice to see the FMNs making a return. I really must extend my borders so that I can spread mine around a little.

    • Hi Janet,

      I’m not sure… I just haven’t really felt the need to photograph the Frits this year. Yes I’ve taken some but I haven’t fallen in love with them like I have previously. Sometimes it just happens; plants fall out of favour. Like I’m beginning to realise I don’t like my Autumn Cherry blooms either. I know other plants too that’s happened with – just can’t name them right now (probably because I don’t like them anymore! 😀 )
      It also happens the other way too – I never used to like Muscari, but now I have quite a lot of it everywhere!

      The F-M-Ns will seed everywhere for you without you needing to spread the seed… And to reply to a comment elsewhere asking how easy it is to collect their seed:- it’s very easy, the plant dies and turns into a dry black/brown stemmy mess. Just break off the stems and rub the seed pods, the old growth will disintegrate easily. Either that or just break it up and sow everything including the dead growth. At my parent’s though the wind blows the seed around and they have F-M-Ns growing everywhere. In almost all the borders, in cracks around the house. You name it.
      I don’t have so much luck here with selfseeding in the borders and I suspect they don’t actually really like the clay soil here but if you have lovely soil like my parents do then I think they’ll love it. They do however, pop up in my pots where obviously the soil is yummy compost.

      • I am fascinated by the in favour – out of favour dynamic, is it from an artistic persepctive or a change in what you want to see in the garden?

        Thanks for the FMN tips, I do seem to be really lucky with the soil in the front, I am not sure they would enjoy the back as much as it tends to be heavier and wetter. I’m going to transplant some plants to the other side so hopefully they will do their thing automatically, but I like the idea of a belt and braces approach, just in case, I am in love with them and would hate to see the back of them now.

        • Hi Janet,

          I’m not sure what causes it… Perhaps artistically they no longer fascinate me so I’m not drawn into taking photos of them. It happens. I’m sure we all find our tastes changing; I used to love pineapple as a child, now I hate it, for example. Trying to think of other plants it’s also happened with…. Cosmos actually. At first I loved them, now I want them but purely for late interest but not because I love them. I know I’ll regret not sowing any seeds this year when it’s September/October and there’s very little left in bloom.
          FMN are fairly easy to move; I’ve never had problems yet, although the main thing to watch out for is their base/roots are very small. They put on a lot of growth from almost no stem and it can be easy to rip them and kill them by accident. So make you to take lots of soil from around it so not to kill it. Other than that, they do move well and of course plenty of water and they’ll be fine after a few days.

  2. Such a lot of lovely pictures of beautiful flowers, yes, its f-m-n time here too and doesn’t everything look lovely with them weaving through! Thanks for the mention, but my snakeshead fritillary drift is quite small, about 6ft x 8ft, and you can’t fall out of love with them, it’s not possible!!

  3. Wow, these are absolutely breathtaking! The flowers AND the photos just couldn’t be any more gorgeous. You are quite talented!

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